Did I mention there are prizes?

Oooops…..I forgot.  If you go onto the Ravelry group check out this post which tells you about the prizes and eligibility.

The top prize is this:

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So join the CAL and get hooking!

Happy crocheting xxx

PS tomorrow morning part 2 will be published, and the discount code will still be available until midnight GMT tomorrow.

 

 

Here in the UK it is almost 9pm on 30th November, but in Australia it is almost 8am on 1st December………..so just for today I’m publishing the CAL pattern in Australian time!

Pattern 1 is now live, turn away if you don’t want a spoiler.

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Pattern 1 is a snowflake:

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You can find the pattern here on Ravelry.

And don’t forget there is a discount code if you look on my Ravelry forum group, available until midnight on 3rd december.

Happy crocheting xxx

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The Advent CAL is now open to subscriptions.   You can purchase the pattern here.

But do have a look on the Ravelry forum here, as you may find a discount!

The 12 decorations will be published from 1st December until 23rd December and there is a prize draw at the end of the year for members of my Ravelry group who share photos of their finished decorations on the discussion thread on Ravelry.

Happy crocheting xxx

 

The Advent CAL starts soon and I plan a blanket CAL in the New Year, so I thought it would be helpful to give you some insight into how I block and especially the things I use to block motifs (decorations and squares!).

I have acquired a lot of blocking ‘kit’ over the years, but you need this sort of kit if you want good results.  It’s no use spending hours lovingly making something only to fail at the last hurdle by not blocking it properly and finding all your effort produces an unshapely item.

These are the things that I use:

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Mat – I use some interlocking gym mats, they are 60cm (2ft) square and I have 8 of them.  I bought them on ebay (I think – it was a long time ago!).  They are perfect for pinning items to.    By interlocking all 8 in a grid 3 by 3 (leaving one space in the centre) I can make a 6ft square which is perfect for getting the edges straight on a large blanket.   Interlocking 2 or 3 together is perfect for a shawl or scarf, and 1 or 2 are great for garment pieces.

Steam iron – this is just my household iron.

Towel – I use old towels

Pins –I like long blocking pins and you can buy these at any yarn shop or online.  I have quite a lot of these now; only a small selection lives on the doggy pincushion!

Wires – I have about 20 wires, bought at a yarn shop and at a yarn festival, you can also purchase them online.

Ruler – I much prefer a solid ruler than a tape measure as it gives an more accurate measurement when blocking flat, this one came with my blocking wires but I also have a folding haberdashery one which read in cm as well as inches.

Spray bottle – for holding water

Soak – or I sometimes use Eucalan

Spray starch – I use this for stiffening hanging decorations, or even mandalas

Kitchen towel 

Blocking Boards – I also have a a couple of blocking boards:

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This one is by Scheepjes and I bought it last year from Deramores (the only UK supplier I could find at the time) but they are now more readily available.  It is 30cm (12inches) square and has 8 plastic coated metal pins which screw into the holes on the board.   It makes blocking squares, triangles, rectangles and octagons very easy and accurate.

But I love hexagons (and snowflakes) and it isn’t laid out to do them.   However, a short while ago I discovered R Hills Wood Turner on Facebook, and he makes the most beautiful blocking boards to order.  So guess what arrived in the post today? This:

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It is a thing of beauty  in thick solid oak, and yes – it is made for hexagons!

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It isn’t quite as large as the Scheepjes square board but I never make huge hexagons (if I ever needed to I would order one of Roger’s boards!).  The holes take 3mm needles or bamboo bbq skewers.

So how do I block?    Well I could write a very lengthy blog about the all the different blocking processes I use, because I vary how I block depending on what I am blocking and the exact yarn content.   However, here’s a ‘nutshell’ explanation:

The first consideration for blocking is the yarn, generally (for me) this means:

Acrylic or other man-made fibres – steam block
Cotton – steam block or wet block
Silk – steam block or wet block
Wool/alpaca and other natural animal fibres – wet block

Wet blocking requires soaking in a solution of Soak (or Eucalan), drying first in a towel (to get rid of excess water) then pinning to shape on the mats using wires and pins (depending on the item) or (for motifs) pinning on the blocking board, then leaving until it is bone dry.

Steam blocking requires pinning to shape and holding the steam iron (low heat, high steam) over the item (about 2cm or 1 inch away – do not touch the item!) until it is well steamed, then leaving until bone dry.  Sometimes I use the spray bottle to spray water on an item before pinning and steaming, it just helps me to shape it a bit.

Spray starch is used on items that need stiffening, such as hanging decorations. I place the blocked items on kitchen towel and spray, then leave until bone dry.    Normally spraying on one side is sufficient, but sometimes it is necessary to do both sides.

I hope this helps you with your blocking in future.

News of the Advent CAL will follow soon!

Happy knitting and crocheting xxx

 

Details of the Advent CAL have been published on Ravelry here.

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Cheshire Bags had a lot of love, so I thought I’d bring forward the publication of another bag design that featured at Cheshire Fibre Festival.  This is the Ollerton Bag:

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It takes 4 x 50g balls of Stylecraft Classique DK yarn , 1 each of 4 different colours.  The pattern includes charts, a schematic for joining and some photo tutorials.

Available on Ravelry here, or soon on LoveCrochet.

Happy crocheting xxxx

The Cheshire Bag was designed for the first Cheshire Fibre Festival. It’s incredibly versatile, can be made from any yarn (just use the correct hook size) and to any size.

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The original used a total 0f 250g of Stylecraft Special DK in 14 different colours – a great stash buster!   And it holds A LOT – 2 blankets is no problem for this voluminous bag!

Before publishing the pattern I decided to make a couple of new samples – one made from 16 granny squares joined together and one made from a ‘solid’ granny square:

These samples use the colours Meadow, Lime, Mustard and Cream – on ball of each to make both bags.  The large one is just as voluminous as the original and the ‘solid’ one is rather more dinky (and lined).  The pattern includes these 2 designs and how to line the bag.

The pattern has just been published on Ravelry here.   As a special introductory offer it is half price if you use the coupon code BAG (valid until midnight UK time 4th November 2016)

Happy crocheting xxx

 

 

The Mobberley Cowl has been published.  You can find it on Ravelry here

Strangely, the colour is very similar to that of the little cyclamen on the Corfu hillsides and olive groves:

Happy crocheting xxx

 

It’s been a tad quiet here hasn’t it?   That’s because I’ve been away on my favourite island experiencing what the locals call the ‘second spring’ which, in Corfu, means a burst of flowers as autumn begins.

We were treated to lots of flowers but I particularly loved the blankets of cyclamen on the hillsides:

The view from our terrace was lovely, and we had plenty of time to watch boating activities in the bay before ambling down to the waterside tavernas:

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One day we watched a spectacular storm brewing overhead:

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And even experienced a few rumbles of earthquakes in the early hours (sorry no photos of that!).

But most of the time we had sparkly seas and blue skies:

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We did pop over to Kassiopi for lunch one day and a visit to Agathis lace shop.  I had a lovely chat with Agathi and was mesmerised by all her beautiful crochet work, she uses traditional patterns that her grandmother used and the finest of cotton threads.  Of course, I had to buy some:

There are so many stitch patterns in the larger piece, I will be studying it for a long time!

It was a lovely refreshing break.   And quite inspirational!

Happy holidays xx

 

 

 

 

 

3 new crochet blankets made an appearance at Cheshire Fibre Festival.

The first was Sandlebridge Stripes Blanket, designed for the blanket workshop, now available as an individual pattern:

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The second Marthall Baby Blanket, which was part of a kit, but now available as an individual pattern:

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The third Snelson Snuggle Blanket, also as part of a kit, but now available as an individual pattern written in 4 sizes:

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All patterns are available on Ravelry and LoveCrochet.  Find the link on the Designs page

Happy crocheting xx

 

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