Round Again CAL – Part 5

Have you made all your circles yet? Don’t worry if you haven’t, just go at a pace that is right for you. But if you have finished you can now start joining.

The pattern here is written in UK crochet terms and these are the abbreviations used

st(s) stitch(es)

ch ch

dc double crochet

tr treble

htr half treble

dtr double treble

ss slip stitch

ch-sp chain space

The motifs are joined as you go, with a final round in your joining colour.  I used a mid grey sock yarn.

Make all the circle motifs first, then lay them out in your blanket shape, moving them around until you have a colour scheme you like.  Then photograph them to remind you of your layout.  You may also wish to thread them onto a knitting needle in the reverse order you will join them.  Either one long circular needle or one needle per row of blanket.

The final round is the same for all motifs and you will end with 24 2ch-sps and 4 3ch-sps.  The motifs are joined at all these ch-sps.

First Motif Final Round: join yarn into any st (for Circle 7 it is best to join into a dtr), 1ch (does not count as st), *1dc, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1tr, 2ch, miss 1 st, (1dtr, 3ch, 1dtr, 2ch) in next st, miss 1 st, 1tr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts; rep from * to end of round, ss to 1st dc to join, break yarn and fasten off.

Start by joining the first row of motifs along the top of your blanket.

As with many join as you go methods, for each ss join insert the hook from the right side (front) through to the wrong side (back) of the motif you are joining to.

Complete your first motif with the final joining round. Then work the final round of the second motif, joining on one side of the first at 8 points as follows:

Final Round: join yarn colour into any st, 1ch (does not count as st), *1dc, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1tr, 2ch, miss 1 st, (1dtr, 3ch, 1dtr, 2ch) in next st, miss 1 st, 1tr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts; rep from * once, 1dc, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1tr, 2ch, miss 1 st, (1dtr, 1ch, ss into 3ch-sp on first motif, 1ch, 1dtr) in next st, 1ch, ss to next 2ch-sp on first motif, miss 1 st, 1tr, 1ch, ss in next 2ch-sp on first motif, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 1ch, ss in next 2ch-sp on first motif, miss 2 sts, 1dc, ss in next 2ch-sp on first motif, 1ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, ss in next 2ch-sp on first motif, 1ch, miss 2 sts, 1tr, ss in next 2ch-sp on first motif, 1ch, miss 1 st, (1dtr, 1ch, ss in 3ch-sp on first motif, 1ch, 1dtr, 2ch) in next st, miss 1 st, 1tr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, 1htr, 2ch, miss 2 sts, ss to 1st dc to join, break yarn and fasten off.

Continue in this way, joining the motifs across rows and then adding new rows on the bottom.   For motifs from the second row onwards most will have to be joined along 2 sides, just follow the same techniques as you join.  When joining into previously joined corners I prefer to place the ss into the space between the motifs that are already joined and over the previous ss join to secure it.

Don’t forget there is a paid for pattern on Ravelry which is also being released in parts and has a US crochet terms available too. It also includes some charts for the joining round.

I would love to see photos of your little circles, please share them on Facebook and Ravelry. Next week is the border.

Until then, happy crocheting xxx

All patterns and photographs are copyright

Round Again CAL – Part 4

How did you like the ruffles last week? They are surprisingly easy to make and add some lovely texture. This week for our last circles we are adding a little lace, but I love the ruffles so much that I decided I should combine them into other circles as well!

The pattern here is written in UK crochet terms and these are the abbreviations used

st(s) stitch(es)

ch ch

dc double crochet

tr treble

htr half treble

dtr double treble

ss slip stitch

ch-sp chain space

PART 4

Circles 7 and 8 are lacy, again useful for single colour yarns.  They use roughly the same amount of yarn as Circle 1.

Circle 7 – lace

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1: 1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in ring, 4ch) 7 times, 1dc, 2ch, 1htr in 1st dc to join (the 2ch, 1htr forms the last 4ch-sp).   [8dc, 8 4ch-sps]

Round 2:  1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in 4ch-sp at base of ch, 2ch, (1dc in next 4ch-sp, 2ch) 7 times, ss in 1st dc to join.  [8dc, 8 2ch-sps]

Round 3: ss in 1st 2ch-sp, 3ch (counts as 1tr), 3tr in same 2ch-sp, 4tr in each remaining 2ch-sp around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [32tr]

Round 4:  1ch (does not count as st), 1dc in sp before 1st tr, 5ch, (1dc in next sp between 2 groups of 4tr, 5ch) 6 times, 1dc in next sp between groups of 4tr, 2ch, 1tr in 1st dc to join (the 2ch, 1tr forms the last 5ch-sp).  [8dc, 8 5ch-sps]

Round 5:  1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in 5ch-sp at base of ch, 5ch, (1dc in next 5ch-sp, 5ch) 7 times, ss in 1st dc to join.  [8dc, 8 5ch-sps]

Round 6: 4ch (counts as 1dtr), 7tr in next 5ch-sp, *1dtr in next dc, 7tr in next 5ch-sp; rep from * to end of round, ss in 4th ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off. [56tr, 8dtr]

I made 14 of Circle 7 for my blanket.

Circle 8 – just a little lace

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1: 1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in ring, 4ch) 7 times, 1dc, 2ch, 1htr in 1st dc to join (the 2ch, 1htr forms the last 4ch-sp).  [8dc, 8 4ch-sps]

Round 2: 1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in 4ch-sp at base of ch, 2ch, (1dc in next 4ch-sp, 2ch) 7 times, ss in 1st dc to join.  [8dc, 8 2ch-sps]

Round 3: ss in 1st 2ch-sp, 3ch (counts as 1tr), 3tr in same 2ch-sp, 4tr in each remaining 2ch-sp around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join. [32tr]

Round 4: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in next st, *1tr in next st, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join. [48tr]

Round 5: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in next st, 2tr in next st, *1tr in each of next 2 sts, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off.  [64tr]

I made 14 of Circle 8 for my blanket.

Now you have completed 8 different circles you could try combining elements from each circle to give more variation.  For example, the following circle is a combination of Circle 7 and Circle 4. 

Circle 9 – a little lace with a small ruffle

As shown in the motif at the bottom of the photo below.

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1: 1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in ring, 4ch) 7times, 1dc, 2ch, 1htr in 1st dc to join (the 2ch, 1htr forms the last 4ch-sp).  [8dc, 8 4ch-sps]

Round 2: 1ch (does not count as st), (1dc in 4ch-sp at base of ch, 2ch, (1dc in next 4ch-sp, 2ch) 7 times, ss in 1st dc to join.  [8dc, 8 2ch-sps]

Round 3: ss in 1st 2ch-sp, 3ch (counts as 1tr), 3tr in same 2ch-sp, 4tr in each remaining 2ch-sp around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [32tr]

Round 4: 5ch (counts as 1dc, 4ch), miss 1 st, *1dc in next st, 4ch, miss 1 st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 1st ch from start to join. [16dc, 16 4ch-sps]

Round 5: work this round behind the 4ch-sps from Round 3, 1ch does not count as st, ss in 1st missed st in Round 2, 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in st at base of ch, 3tr in each following missed st, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [48tr]

Round 6: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in next st, 2tr in next st, *1tr in each of next 2 sts, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off.  [64tr]

I made 9 different combined circles for my blanket.

Don’t forget there is a paid for pattern on Ravelry which is also being released in parts and has US crochet terms available too.

I would love to see photos of your little circles, please share them on Facebook and Ravelry. Next week it is joining!

Until then, happy crocheting xxx

All patterns and photographs are copyright

Crochet in March

March is National Crochet Month in the US and has, over several years, expanded to become International Crochet Month. I love to do something special for this crochet month and this year I decided I would look to one of my designs from 2014 – March Crochet Scarf. 2014 was the year I challenged myself to design one scarf a month, and March was the one I designed in March!

So what better way to celebrate than to offer March Crochet Scarf at a sale price for the whole month. So from midnight GMT tonight until midnight GMT on 31st March, you can get 25% off the price of the March Crochet Scarf pattern on Ravelry. No coupon code required, the sale is automatic.

Now this is a pattern I love – it uses just one skein (100g) of 4 ply yarn but can be adapted to any yarn weight. So I am going for a rummage in my stash and plan to make another March Crochet Scarf this month. Check back here for updates! Meanwhile here is a photo of this lovely scarf

Happy crocheting xxx

Round Again CAL – Part 2

I hope you have made lots of little circles from Part 1. I’ve been blown away by the many lovely circles I’ve seen! This week we make a simple variation of the first circle in Circles 2 and 3 which use slightly less yarn, great if you have a few scraps that weren’t quite enough for Circle 1. 

Keep those scales out as it really is useful to weigh them as you make them. I found each used just a little less than 3g/12m. And keep that ruler/tape handy as I know many of you have found variations in size and needed to adjust.

These are a selection of Circles 2 and 3, they have ‘spokes’ in them so that’s why I chose their names.

The patterns are written in UK crochet terms and use the same stitches as last week, with just one addition: ch-sp which means chain space. The other abbreviations can be found in that post. Don’t forget there is a paid for pattern on Ravelry which is also being released in parts and has a US crochet terms available too.

Circle 2 – centre spoke

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), (1tr in ring, 1ch) 7 times, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [8tr, 8 1ch-sps]

Round 2: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in st at base of ch, 2tr in each st and in each 1ch-sp around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [32tr]

Round 3: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in next st, *1tr in next st, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [48tr]

Round 4: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in next st, 2tr in next st, *1tr in each of next 2 sts, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off.  [64tr]

Circle 3 – mid spoke

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 15tr in ring, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [16tr]

Round 2: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), (1tr, 1ch) in each st around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [16tr, 16 1ch-sps]

Round 3: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in next 1ch-sp, *1tr in next st, 2tr in next 1ch-sp; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [48tr]

Round 4: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in next st, 2tr in next st, *1tr in each of next 2 sts, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off.  [64tr]

I made 24 each of Circles 2 and 3 for my blanket.

I would love to see photos of your little circles, please share them on Facebook and Ravelry.

Next week the circle has a bit more texture.

Until then, happy crocheting xxx

The patterns and photographs in this post are copyright

Round Again CAL – Part 1

I hope you are all ready for Part 1 of the Round Again Blanket CAL. This is the first of 6 parts of the CAL and introduces the simple circle. This is not at all difficult provided you know how to work in the round and count stitches. There are only 4 rounds and I made quite a few of these, however they are very quick to make. They will help you to see how some of your variegated scrap sock yarns look in the round and I recommend you make one of these circles for each of your different scrap yarns. Don’t forget there is a paid for pattern on Ravelry which is also being released in parts and has a US crochet terms available too.

When you have made a few circles in different yarns, measure each of them.   They should all be roughly the same size at around 9cm across.  If you are using sock yarn of different wool blends or meterage you may find that the motifs vary a little in size; provided this variation isn’t too great then it won’t really matter.  But some may vary significantly so you may need to adjust. I found small variations, mainly only a mm or so, but a few were a bit too big.  I adjusted these by reducing the height changing the stitches on the final round, for example I used half treble (US half double crochet) rather than treble (US double crochet) on the final round; this was much quicker than frogging the whole circle and trying a smaller hook!

If you find the odd one is a bit small you may find working larger stitches on the final round will adjust sufficiently.

You may also wish to weigh them.  Knowing how much yarn is used for each motif may help you decide which to make with your remaining yarn. I found each Circle 1 used about 3g/12m of sock yarn.

The pattern here is written in UK crochet terms and these are the abbreviations used

ch chain

tr treble

ss slip stitch

Circle 1 in sparkly yarn

Pattern

Foundation: 4ch, join into a ring with a ss.

Round 1:  3ch (counts as 1tr), 15tr in ring, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [16tr]

Round 2:  3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in st at base of ch, 2tr in each st around, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [32tr]

Round 3: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in next st, *1tr in next st, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join.  [48tr]

Round 4: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in next st, 2tr in next st, *1tr in each of next 2 sts, 2tr in next st; rep from * to end of round, ss in 3rd ch from start to join, break yarn and fasten off.  [64tr]

I made 52 of these for my blanket.

I would love to see photos of your little circles, please share them on Facebook and Ravelry.

A selection of my 52 circles

Next week in Part 2 I will be giving some very simple variations to Circle 1.

Until then, happy crocheting xxx

All photos and patterns are copyright.

Spoiler alert!

This year’s blanket CAL has been a long time in the making, I have been so slow, and I have no excuses. Maybe it is simply that I have slowed down during these strange times we are living in and prefer to enjoy every stitch as I make it. But it is progressing to the finish line and it’s about time to share some of it with you.

First – my inspiration.

Some years ago when I was a stash building addict, I bought an Opal Sock Yarn Advent Calendar containing 24 mini balls of colourful sock yarn. I thoroughly enjoyed opening the calendar each day and finding a different coloured ball.  I really didn’t know what to do with the mini balls, they remained a colourful collection in my stash but eventually I found a simple flower motif and decided to make lots of these colourful flowers. It became one of those projects you pick up between larger projects and after a long time I managed to make over 100 of these flowers.  I decided to join them so I designed a border to make each flower a square.  I bought some pale grey yarn to create the border and join the squares as you go.   A very long time after I started to open those advent calendar ‘doors’ a lovely lap blanket emerged which I gifted to my sister.   I never took any notes of this project, nor did I take any photographs.  I just enjoyed the long lingering project.

Roll on a good number of years and I find I have accumulated plenty of scraps of yarn of all sorts – the vast majority of them being sock/4 ply or fingering weight – all roughly the same meterage per 100g in a variety of colours and yarn types.    Much of this is because I have finally found my sock knitting mojo – I have made over 20 pairs in the last 2 years and most for myself. And I have small feet so I have plenty left over from 100g balls of sock yarn! So this was the year I decided to use up all these sock yarn scraps in my CAL (ok it’s not the first time I have done this remember Wrapped in Memories?).

I wanted a really relaxing project, something straightforward that can be done at crochet/knitgroup (I’m sure you’ve all experienced the frogging after taking a project with only a modicum of complexity to a crochet/knitgroup meeting!).  I also wanted some uniformity so that the scrap project looked like it was meant to be made as a blanket not just a mess of colours.  And I wanted to use the same border to each motif, in the same colour  just like I did with the Opal mini ball project.   Grey was a good choice for this, I think white or cream would be a stark contrast to the colours and make them stand out too much and I really do not like the stained glass effect of black, but grey helps the colours to blend gently on the eye.  

The motifs are all the same shape. I started doodling a crochet circle and decided straightaway that circles should be the theme. So the CAL blanket progressed, the pattern is written and I have a few testers lined up (but shout if you’d like to help).

Want a sneak preview? Well these are all my motifs, all lined up ready for the final joining round. They are now all joined and the blanket is almost complete.

The CAL will be free on this blog, although a more detailed paid for pattern will also be available. My next post will give you more details of the CAL start date and timescale, but for now enjoy the sneak preview of all my little circles!

Happy crocheting xxx

Cloud CAL part 1

I can’t believe a week has passed since I introduced this CAL.   But here we are ready to start Part 1!   I hope you have selected your yarn and beads.  I have seen a few people considering the colour of beads, so if you are undecided I suggest you wait until you’ve done a bit of Part 1 and then try the beads against the crochet.

I am joining the CAL as well, and this is my yarn choice, plus some beads (I’m undecided on the beads):

DSC02849

The yarn is vintage Natural Dye Studio Cobweb, I have 50g with approx 360m – maybe I have enough for 2.  That would be good as I am so undecided on the beads – it gives me the option to try another colour of beads!

So are you ready?  Well, let’s start 🙂

First weigh your yarn.  Sometimes the ball is a slightly different weight to that expected.  Mine was only 22.95g rather than 25g but it had been lurking in my stash for years, so I may have used a little of it on a project.

DSC02800

You will need to weigh your remaining yarn regularly as you work.  So make a note of the amount you started with and keep those scales handy as you work.  Now do a little maths – first divide by 2 and then add 0.2g.   For me this was:

22.95 divided by 2 equals 11.475, add 0.2 equals 11.675.  I rounded this up to 11.7g

Keep a note of your number because you need to stop crocheting the first part when your remaining yarn weighs this amount!

What if you have more than a 25g ball?   Well, you work until you have used about 12.3g or the length is half what you want.

Tension/gauge does not matter for this design, but you do need to ensure you keep a loose stitch for a light and airy feel to the scarf.    For this you must allow the hook to decide the stitch size and do not pull the yarn tight when you complete each stitch.

I found 22.95g was sufficient for a scarf approx. 10cm wide by 220cm long (in Rowan Kidsilk Haze yarn, 22.95g is about 190m).   So unless you want a very long scarf, and provided you have a full ball of yarn, then you can afford to do a little tension trial to start with.  Try the first 4 rows – this should measure approx. 10cm wide and 5cm long.  It doesn’t matter if you are a bit out.  But if you are a lot out (say more than 20%) try using a different hook – bigger hook if your swatch is too small, smaller hook if you swatch is too big.  Having said that, if you like the look of your tension swatch it really doesn’t matter if it isn’t the correct size!

Now we can start crocheting!

The pattern is written in UK terms only, so here are the abbreviations I use (with US in brackets, if different):
st(s) = stitch(es)
sp(s) = space(s)
ch = chain
ch-sp(s) = chain space(s)
dc = double crochet (US single crochet)
tr = treble (US double crochet)
t2tog = work 2 treble together (US dc2tog, work 2 dc together)

Foundation: make 21ch

Row 1: Turn and work 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, (1dc in next ch, 1ch, miss 1 ch, 1dc in next ch) repeated until last ch, 1dc in last ch, turn.  You should have 6 1ch-sps and 14dc.

Now to make life easy for you when doing the next row, place a stitch marker in every 1ch-sp, like this:

DSC02804

Row 2: 2ch, *(1tr, 1ch, 1tr) in 1ch-sp (where the stitch marker is), missing all the dc inbetween; repeat from * to last 1ch-sp, in this last 1ch-sp you do something slightly different: (1tr, 1ch) in last 1ch-sp, tr2tog placing first part in the same 1ch-sp and second part in last dc on the Row, turn.  You can remove your stitch markers now.

The first 2ch and 1tr together count as a tr2tog – so you start and end the row with a tr2tog which helps give a firm edge.

Row 3: 2ch, *(1tr, 1ch, 1tr) in 1ch-sp; repeat from * to last 1ch-sp, in this last 1ch-sp you do something slightly different: (1tr, 1ch) in last 1ch-sp, now tr2tog placing first part in last 1ch-sp and second part in last st on the Row (this is the top of the 2ch at start of last Row), turn.  You should now see that the pattern is a series of V sts.

Row 3 is the pattern, repeat it until your remaining yarn weighs that magic number you calculated – it must be no less than this number, so you may want to weigh your yarn regularly and estimate when that magic number will be reached.   I did a total of 77 rows.

This is how my stitches look, light and open with a lovely haze:

DSC02829

Do not break yarn when you reach the end – wait until next week when I show you what to do next!

Some tips on working this design:

As I mentioned in tension, let the hook decide the size of your stitch – do not pull the yarn once the hook is through the stitch as this will tighten it too much and you won’t get the open cloud-like effect.

It is very easy to miss the yarn and hook a bit of the fluff instead.  So check that you have placed you stitches correctly at the end of each Row.   It means stopping for a few seconds to look, but it is worth the effort as that check can save some frogging later.

If you do have to frog, go very slowly and use the hook to help break the fibres that somehow manage to blend together in the fluff, don’t use scissors as it is easy to have an accident and cut your yarn!

If you have plenty of yarn and want a wider scarf, then increase your foundation chain in multiples of 3ch, each 3ch extra gives an additional V st to each Row.

Please feel free to ask questions, here or on Ravelry or on Facebook.  And please share progress photos!

Until next week, happy crocheting xxx

Festival Bag

It is now the latter half of August and many of the usual UK summer festivals are over, but there are still a few to go and just enough time for you to make yourself something retro to take with you. To inspire you here is my quick make festival bag:

DSC01575

When I was making it I thought wouldn’t it be fun if people who visit the Cheshire Fibre Festival could come wearing some festival garments or accessories.  Summer will be over by the time of CFF but we could brighten it up couldn’t we?  So are you up for it?  It could simply be a bag like this, or anything else you want to wear/make.     I’m happy to bring my bag and I may wear some flowers in my hair!

To help you – here’s my recipe for the bag.

It is made from scraps of DK yarn (Stylecraft Special DK) and based on 2 granny squares.  I made two 9 round grannies in slightly different colours, and the bag ended up approx. 24cm square excluding the pompom trim and handle.   But you can make it any size you like.  Mine used a total of 70g of yarn, but the blue edging and handle was the most – probably about 30g (but this isn’t accurate, just my guesstimate).

Abbreviations :
St (s) = stitch (es)
Sp = space
Ch = chain
Dc= double crochet
Tr = treble
Ss = slip stitch

Start with a couple of granny squares.

DSC01568

Then using the colour for the joining, edging and handle (blue in my case), work dc  all the way around 3 sides of the first square, I did 1dc per st or sp along the edge, and (1dc, 1ch, 1dc) in the corner sps.  Do not break the yarn but carry on and work dc similarly around 3 sides of the other granny, your grannies will be joined at one point.

Now put the grannies wrong sides together and join by working dc through both granny edges all around the 3 sides.

DSC01571

Do not break the yarn but make a chain the length of the handle (I did 100) and join to the other edge of the bag with a ss.

DSC01572

Now turn and work a round of dc all along the handle and then around the top of one side of the bag.   Do another round of dc along the handle and the same top.  Break yarn and finish off.

Rejoin yarn to the underside of the foundation ch of the handle and repeat 2 rounds of dc along this side and the other top of the bag, on the last round when you reach the centre of the top of the bag make a ch loop to fit a button – I did 8ch.

If you make a bigger bag you may want a wider handle, if so just do more rounds of dc either side of the handle.

DSC01573

Sew the button to the other side of the bag and make a tassel and attach to the button loop.

You could finish there but I wanted an edging all around the sides and I opted for little crochet pompoms.  You can find out how to do them here  (beware it is in US crochet terms!).   I made mine all the way around 3 sides, leaving a 3 st gap between each pompom chain.   You could just do a fringe if you  like.

If you make one, please share a photo of it.

Happy crocheting xxx

I may be showing….

Last year at Yarndale I was fortunate to have 2 of my designs on display at the show, one was the Simple Scarf which was on display at Willow Knits:

006

The other was Medina Cowl on the Inside Crochet stand:

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Yes, they were in similar autumnal colours in luscious silk yarn!

I would love to attend a show as an exhibitor, and maybe one year I will, but not yet.  So I was overjoyed when Nic from Yarns from the Plain asked if she could use some of my designs in kits which she’ll sell at shows.  She is very local to me, and even attends the same knitgroup from time to time, so is a natural partner for me.  Not only that but her yarn is British, which I love.  So I’ve been busily swatching a few of my designs in her yarn bases, estimating quantities and re-writing a the patterns to fit with the yarns.  We even spent a lovely afternoon drooling over a huge rainbow of her yarn, selecting colours for the designs.

It is a long run time before anything emerges, the samples have to be made, and Nic is doing most of that herself as it will help her to understand the patterns when she puts them on her stand, new photographs taken and the packs developed.  I have started to see the results of the first sample and I can promise you they will be colourful and beautiful!  I really can’t wait…..but I have to be patient.   So if you want to see my designs at the shows this year, just follow Nic and see where Yarns from the Plain is showing!

Happy crocheting xxxx

 

Woo hoo! part 6!

Part 6 of the Winter Blanket CAL has just been published.   It includes some texture in the form of raised stitches as well as some openwork.

Here it is:

DSC01195

There are 4 of this square needed for the blanket, and that means that the centre 25 suqares are now released.  Do you want to see what it looks like?

Well here it is in all the glorious colour:

DSC01194

One of the 6 published squares isn’t seen on this block, but the other 5 are there.

Only 2 squares and the edging to go before it is all complete!

You can find the pattern here and join in the discussion here.

Happy crocheting xx